#Write31Days: Day 21 Books and Blogs about Foster Care/Adoption

Ok, so you have found my blog.

And it’s quite obviously your favorite blog, especially on the topics of foster care and adoption…

But you want MORE!

write-31-days-21

Well, I can give you more! I’m not an expert, but I’m an avid reader and I want to share with you some of the books and resources that I have found super helpful to me on my journey through foster care.

** This post does contain affiliate links, which means that if you order any of the books that I link, I get a small compensation.

((Which also means that you should totally order these books directly from my links because you know you want to help a girl out))

Books with a Christian Perspective on FC/Adoption:
“Orhpanology” by Tony Merida. A MUST read. Get it now.
“Adopted for Life” by Russell D. Moore
“Faith to Foster” by TJ and Jenn Menn. This memoir is a MUST READ for anyone who is interested in fostering, who is fostering or who is playing a support role in the life of foster parents. Not only do they record their own experiences of foster care, but they give incredible advice and takeaways behind the events that happen in the foster care world.
Books (Informational):
I loved reading these informational-type books (think: Adoption is for Dummies type book), because they seemed to give such a great overview from lots of different perspectives).
Adoption Nation (Adam Pertman)
To the End of June (Chris Beam) (super boring, but really informational about older youth who age out of the foster care system. Very secular perspective)
Falling Free (Shannan Martin) This book will simply challenge your faith and encourage you to do hard things. In so many ways, that was foster care for me. God doesn’t call us to make comfortable lives on here on earth, and in so many ways I need to be stepping out in faith to what God has called us to. This book really challenged and encouraged me in that, and I cannot recommend it highly enough.
The Connected Child
 
Books/Novels/Biographies/Memoirs:
A Child Called “It”, A Man named Dave (super hard and heavy read. You will weep. A very detailed memoir into the abuses that a child suffered under his biological Mom, and then his next 12 years in the foster care system. Since he was in the system in the 80s, things have changed a lot since then and it isn’t necessarily an accurate view of what foster care looks like now, but it is a good read to open your eyes to the abuses that children suffer both before entering the system and while in the system).
Garbage Bag Suitcase (Shenendoah Chefalo). A memoir of a girl growing up in an abuse home who eventually checked herself into foster care. She chronicles not only the abuses she suffered, but also her deep desire for attachment and love (which she never found until her adult life). It’s also a must-read.
Orphan Train (Christina Kline). This is a fabulous read that gives insight not only into what it’s like being a teen foster child, but also what it was like being on The Orphan Train of America’s past.
The Language of Flowers (Vanessa Diffenbaugh). Although this novel is not focused too much on the actual world of foster care, it does give so much insight into what happens to a young girl aging out of the foster care system. Throughout the beautiful and intriguing story, you also catch glimpses into the pain and heartache that a foster child goes through when have been abandoned over and over. The trust issues run deep, and this story is no exception. It’s beautiful, and even if you aren’t into plants or flowers, you will find yourself absolutely fascinated by them throughout this story!
 
 
Blogs:
As you know, I read a lot of blogs! These are some of my favorites, and are very informational and give some great glimpses into the foster care world.
http://www.rageagainsttheminivan.com/ (Kristen adopted her two boys from the foster care system. She also has two biological children and blogs A LOT about race and other controversial/hot topics in the media. She posts about a lot of other things, too!)
https://droppinganchorsblog.com/ (One of the best foster care blogs you will find. It’s written by several different foster Moms who compile blog posts. Super helpful!)
http://www.laurencasper.com/ (A beautiful blog that chronicles infertility, overseas adoption and all the ups and downs in between!)
http://www.nobohnsaboutit.com/ (My FAVORITE. She’s hilarious. She adopted her two oldest from foster care, and always has an amazing perspective on the situation)
https://fosterthefamilyblog.com/ (So good. She writes A LOT and is a huge wealth of information into the world of foster care)
http://www.mymessymanger.com/ (beautiful family, just doing life.)
http://mamamem.blogspot.com/ (super informational and you can always count on her to respond to the controversial/headline stuff!)
http://www.whitesugarbrownsugar.com/ (so much information on adoption and multi-racial families!)
Websites:

Questions?

If you have any questions at all about foster care or adoption from foster care as I go through this series, please don’t hesitate to ask. You can leave a comment or send an email. At the end of the series, I will have a Q&A day and will be answering any questions I receive throughout the month.

Previous posts:

Day 1: Introduction

Day 2: Meet the Hines

Day 3: Shop Feature: Karla Storey

Day 4: Why We Chose to Foster

Day 5: The Process

Day 6: The Cast of Characters

Day 7: The Paperwork

Day 8: The Goal is Reunification

Day 9: Reflections

Day 10: Shop Feature: Ransomed Cuffs

Day 11: The Placement

Day 12: The Daily Life

Day 13: The Extra’s

Day 14: Bonding

Day 15: The Goodbye

Day 16: Reflection

Day 17: Shop Feature: Together we Rise

Day 18: Finances

Day 19: Rules

Please share and interact!

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#Write31Days

You can find the official #Write31Days and all the other bloggers who are linking up by clicking here.

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